April 21, 2017

FRIDAY'S WITH FARLEY: Another Dose of Useless Tidbits

• Digital Delights...
 on Atlas Obscura

The Artists Who Depicted World War
In spring 1918, as hundreds of thousands of doughboys poured into Europe, one special group of eight American soldiers were brought together to provide an artistic take on the war. America’s first official “combat artists” roamed battlefields over the next year and produced a vast body of work—some 700 sketches and paintings—that captured the war experience for both the home front and the historical record...read the complete article HERE
“Going into position through a ruined town,” by Harvey Thomas Dunn
“Two six-ton tanks climbing a hill,” by Harry Everett Townsend.
Click to enlarge
• Socialized...
Found on Facebook
The Facebook page for the new movie Dunkirk
From filmmaker Christopher Nolan (“Interstellar,” “Inception,” “The Dark Knight” Trilogy) comes the epic action thriller DUNKIRK, In Theaters July 21, 2017
Can't Wait for this one!


• History Buff Heaven...
With Their Bare Hands: General Pershing, the 79th Division, and the Battle for Montfaucon by Gene Fax. 
Just finished up this great book....
With Their Bare Hands which traces the fate of the US 79th Division-men drafted off the streets of Baltimore, Washington, and Philadelphia-from their training camp in Maryland through the final years of World War I, focusing on their most famous engagement: the attack on Montfaucon, the most heavily fortified part of the German Line, during the Meuse-Argonne Offensive in 1918. 

Using the 79th as a window onto the American Army as a whole, Gene Fax examines its mistakes and triumphs, the tactics of the AEF commander-in-chief General John J. Pershing, and how the lessons it learned during the Great War helped it to fight World War II. Fax makes some startling judgments, on the role of future Army Chief-of-Staff, Colonel George C. Marshall; whether the Montfaucon battle-had it followed the plan-could have shortened the war; and if Pershing was justified in ordering his troops to attack right up to the moment of the Armistice. Drawing upon original documents, including orders, field messages, and the letters and memoirs of the soldiers themselves, some of which have never been used before, Fax tells the engrossing story of the 79th Division's bloody involvement in the final months of World War I.

• Benched...
the workbench of John Hoenig, Scenic Factory
Click to enlarge

• Art of the Toy Soldier...
Click to enlarge
• Built ...
Stunning 1/6th scale British Tommy by an unknown artist
Stunning 120mm vignette by unknown artist
• Collected ...
Grenade guys...

• The Parting Shot ...
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