October 29, 2016

MTSC PRODUCT SPOTLIGHT: Perry Miniatures American Civil War 28mm Plastic Figure Set Range

Perry Miniatures 28mm plastic American Civil War figure sets. These multi-pose sets come on sprues and assembly is required. The massive variety of heads, arms, equipment and weapons allow for unlimited pose combinations and conversions. 



Coming Soon-
ACW120 Union Infantry in Sack Coats Skirmishing 1861-65
The Perry’s thought there was more they could do with the frames in their new Union Infantry 1861-65 (ACW115) box so they have decided to produce a second boxed set to allow full use of the skirmish element. The figures in this box are in skirmishing poses; firing, loading and running. They all wear sack coats and have the choice of either forage caps or broad-brimmed hats. The figures are the same as the Union Infantry box (ACW 115) but are a different mix, to allow a skirmish force to be built. In this box you get 8 skirmish frames (loading, firing, kneeling ) to make 24 figures in these poses. There are 2 of the 'main' Union Infantry frames and a command frame. You could also create a firing line with most of the figures, as although firing lines all stood to fire (as per regulations), a prolonged firefight would degenerate into some men kneeling to offer a smaller target. You also get 64 x 20mm round bases in this set.


Perry Miniatures ACW Plastic Sets


ACW001 American Civil War Infantry
36 figures including head gear (36 forage caps and 36 slouch hats), command figures, flags, and set of rules
ACW002 American Civil War Cavalry. 12 mounted cavalrymen, 12 separate forage caps, 12 slouch hats, 12 carbines, 12 sword arms, 6 pistol arms, enough parts to create 3 command groups, 2 Union guidons, 2 Confederate guidons, and a simple set of rules
ACW070 American Civil War Zouaves. This box contains 42 Zouaves including command. They are represented in full zouave kit, the most colourful uniforms seen on the battlefields of the American Civil War. The figures are all advancing rapidly with arms that allow you to depict them all at 'right shoulder shift' or at the more intimidating 'charge'. Also for all the zouaves both unadorned fezzes and fezzes with turbans.
ACW080 American Civil War Confederate Infantry 1862-1865. The figures in this box represent a Confederate infantry regiment form 1862 onwards although there are a fair amount of units that can be depicted from 1861 too. They are all represented in short jackets typical of the entire Confederate Army from mid-1863. Both caps and broad-brimmed hats are included for all figures as some regiments adopted the hat and others the cap, although most had a mix. All figures have separate arms to allow you build the regiment at ‘right shoulder shift’ or at the charge

ACW90 American Civil War Artillery 1861-65. This set contains 3 guns, 3 limbers and 18 crew plus bases. There are 4 gun barrels for each gun; Napoleon 12pdr, 3 inch Ordnance Rifle, 10 pdr Parrott and 12 pdr Howitzer. All the crew are multipose with many separate arm variants to enable you to create the right drill positions for the guns. There are separate forage caps, kepis and slouch hats for all the crew so you can choose which side to portray.
Latest release >>>ACW115 American Civil War Union Infantry 1861-65 The figures in this box represent the look of the typical Union Infantry throughout the Civil War. They are all wearing sack coats and all have the option of either forage caps or slouch hats. There are 40 figures in this set. Up to 30 figures can be build in either charging or 'right shoulder shift' poses. There is a 4 man command, but there are arms on this frame to add to the infantry for NCO's and a bugler. There are also an additional 6 skirmishers in the box. These together with the loading arms on the main frame allow many variations in poses.

Available November 2016>>>ACW120 American Civil Union Infantry in Sack Coats Skirmishing 1861-65. The figures in this box are in skirmishing poses; firing, loading and running. They all wear sack coats and have the choice of either forage caps or broad-brimmed hats. The figures are the same as the Union Infantry box (ACW 115) but are a different mix, to allow a skirmish force to be built. In this box you get 8 skirmish frames (loading, firing, kneeling ) to make 24 figures in these poses. There are 2 of the 'main' Union Infantry frames and a command frame. You could also create a firing line with most of the figures, as although firing lines all stood to fire (as per regulations), a prolonged firefight would degenerate into some men kneeling to offer a smaller target. We decided to put individual bases in the set too, as it's aimed at more of a skirmish game. You also get 64 x 20mm round bases in this set 
PRM-BB1 American Civil War Battle in A Box. This box includes 2 Generals, 145 Infantry, 12 Cavalry, 18 Artillerymen, 4 guns, 1 Farmhouse, over 4 feet of fencing, unit bases for all figures, a revised 'Firepower' rule set by Alessio Cavatore, uniform guide and flags.
PRM-RPB01 North American Farmhouse 1750-1900. The building represents a weatherboard North American cabin or farmhouse. It’s loosely based on Meade’s headquarters during the battle of Gettysburg in 1863 and similar buildings.The style and construction means that it can be used from 1750 to 1900 and beyond.









We also carry the Perry ACW metal range to compliment the plastics

Don't miss our multi-part Build, Paint & Play Perry Miniatures ACW Series
VIEW Build, Paint & Play The Perry Miniatures ACW Box Set pt.1 w/Matt Koltonow
VIEW Build, Paint & Play The Perry Miniatures ACW Box Set pt.2 w/Matt Koltonow
VIEW Build, Paint & Play The Perry Miniatures ACW Box Set pt.3 w/Matt Koltonow
VIEW Build, Paint & Play The Perry Miniatures ACW Box Set pt.4 w/Matt Koltonow
VIEW Build, Paint & Play The Perry Miniatures ACW Box Set pt.5 w/Matt Koltonow
VIEW Build, Paint & Play The Perry Miniatures ACW Box Set pt.6 w/Matt Koltonow
VIEW Build, Paint & Play The Perry Miniatures ACW Box Set pt.7 w/Matt Koltonow 

October 28, 2016

Fridays with Farley...Another Dose of Useless Tidbits for Halloween 2016


The Good Stuff...
Why Women Pretended to Be Creepy Rocks and Trees in NYC Parks During WWI
Imagine taking a quiet stroll through the expansive wilderness of Van Cortlandt Park in Bronx, New York. You’re surrounded by a forest of oak trees, stony ridges, and a tranquil lake—completely isolated and alone in nature. But in 1918, visitors to the 1,146-acre park were unaware that they were in the company of a group of women hiding among the rocks, trees, and grass.


“Weird shapes, the color of the rocks and earth, moved here and there, and from the tops of trees came loud halloos and catcalls from other shapeless objects,” journalist Elene Foster wrote in the April 28, 1918 issue of the New York Tribune. “I stumbled over a hump of grass, which squealed when I stepped on it, and rose before me."

The women disguised in special (and fairly creepy) dried grass or "rock suits" were student military camouflage artists, or camoufleurs, of the Women’s Reserve Camouflage Corps, a forgotten division of the National League for Women’s Service.


Female artists across the United States joined the ranks of this highly specialized military group in New York to help with the war effort during World War I. They used their creativity and crafting skills to develop designs and patterns that mimicked the landscape to provide soldiers with added protection.


Parks were used as laboratories to test different camouflage suits, and city streets doubled as studios for them to paint dazzling, distracting designs on battleships.
View the complete article HERE 

*Atlas Obscura is the definitive guidebook and friendly tour-guide to the world's most wondrous & hidden places, strange facts and unique events.

Halloween is near, time for an old school monster mash-up...
Remco married the Universal Monsters with the pure goodness that is the 3-inch action figure in 1980 and also created a combination carrying case/creepy house playset that could hold all the characters. It was so cool to strap Frankenstein to his table and have Dracula rise from his crypt you?d forget the fact that it?s not likely these dudes would actually ever hang out!


Blogged!
The Doctors Model Mansion*
Check out the amazing model collection of Mark Glassy who creates simply amazing models based on the Universal Monsters, Hammer films, Ray Harryhausen films, sci-fi and rare and unusual subjects all featured on his amazing blog The Doctors Model Mansion.  


*Prepare to be thrilled by the amazing model collection of Dr. Mark C. Glassy, cancer researcher and vinyl/resin monster and sci-fi model kit enthusiast.









• Socialized
found on Facebook..

Over the years we have sold a lot of different magazines in our shop. One thing that remains constant is the popularity of Amazing Figure Modeler Magazine. Now in it's 21st year this is a beautiful magazine that hits on all aspects of garage kit modeling, T.V., Movie, Sci-fi, Horror and Fantasy kits and so much more in dazzling full color, eye-popping hobby coverage, and a format that is often copied but never duplicated! AFM features comprehensive modeling instruction by some of the best modelers in the industry and entertaining interviews and profiles with legends and up and coming talents. Throw in extensive reviews of new kits and hobby products and you have one the coolest magazines out there.



• Sited
The Witches of Halloween Past on smithsonianmag.com
Sexy or scary, the outfit has cast a spell on costume wearers going back many years...a look back at Halloween Pin-ups


• Built
Brad Gilbert's Mars Attacks! 
featuring Moebius Models MOE-936 Mars Attacks: Martian Warrior




• Benched

Old School...

A. M. Warkaskw's Hobby Center
Whatever your hobby is - modelmaking, handicrafts, electronics - this bench is a perfect center for your activities.   Its crammed with ideas taken from several types of industrial benches.   Every inch of it serves to make your hobby more fun.   There's plenty of room for storing tools and supplies, and lots of working space.   And that unusal stool lets you relax. Both pieces were designed by A. M. Warkaske, Editor of Rockwell's Flying Chips.
From Popular Science magazine 1940s

New School...

• The Parting Shot...


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October 27, 2016

"I'M SAYIN' WHAT?" Contest #30 Winner + This week's teaser for "I'M SAYIN' WHAT?" #31

"I'm Sayin' What?" #30 WINNER
It's Thursday so...we have a winner for last weeks “I’m Saying What” contest. Darrell Yates has snagged one of the most coveted prizes on earth...which is of course is a $25.00 Gift Card from Michigan Toy Soldier.
"I'm Sayin' What?" #31 Teaser

Here's our image for this weeks contest. All you have to do is come up with the wittiest quote for the word bubble and you will win a $25.00 gift card from Michigan Toy Soldier Company. Just think... you get free stuff and you get show off your comedic charms that will fly around the world via  ‘Over The Top’ ‘News From The Front’ Google+ & Facebook pages. We will post the winning entry right here next Thursday.

Email your entries to: michtoystaff@michtoy.com
FYI- Have a cool image you'd like to get captioned? Send it to us at michtoystaff@michtoy.com and we will give you $25.00 gift card for any images used.

October 26, 2016

FIGURE OF THE WEEK #130: Halloween 2016 Edition- Aurora's Gigantic Frankenstein


Aurora's Gigantic Frankenstein aka "Big Frankie"Back in the 60's one of the most exciting of Aurora’s monster models was the Gigantic Frankenstein released in 1964 and standing 19″ inches tall. “Big Frankie” was the Frankenstein’s Monster toy/collectible/model to have. The Frankie model kit gave kids the chance to literally create their very own friend. Unlike most other models, the Frankenstein here was pretty durable, had moveable arms and most importantly, it stood two feet tall! Here was a toy you could take along on family trips, or on secret missions. I always thought this kit was a bit silly, but I've grown to appreciate the level of detail and styling that the Aurora designers put into this kit which was originally designed to be released as a finished toy. Although it is a more whimsical subject, they did not abandon quality and craftsmanship to create "Big Frankie."

Unfortunately many kids did not take it as seriously as the other Aurora monster kits. It also carried a price 5 times higher than the regular kits. All this added up to be the kiss of death for Frankie. Sales were poor and he was dropped from the shelves after a short run. 
Moebius Models reissued the kit 2008.





A Gallery of Big Frankie
...

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Toys in the Attic: Aurora Monster Models of the 1960s Part 13 - Gigantic Frankenstein aka Big Frankie


Gigantic Frankenstein 
The idea behind this kit came from legendary toy designer Marvin Glass (Mr. Machine, Mouse Trap) Originally designed to be a toy, Aurora got cold feet and released the figure as a model instead. The fact that the sculpt was more of a caricature then a realistic version of Boris Karloff as the Monster made it less appealing to the kids that were buying the extremely successful line of monster models the company made. 


Standing almost two feet tall, "Big Frankie" was Aurora's largest figure kit and sold for whooping $4.98. Three small bottles of paint- yellow, blue and red were included in the kit and featured the Aurora logo on the cap. The model featured moveable arms and included a chain around the monster's neck and drags a piece of tombstone.

Original Kit Issued: 1964-65 as kit #470
Sculptor: Ehling
Box art: James Bama
Plastic: Lt. Grey, dark grey, black and copper.
Box size: 18" X 15" X 5”

Re-Issued by Moebius Models 2008




October 25, 2016

Trench Runner Pat Hillard Attacks the Plastic Soldier Company (PSC) Late War British Armoured Division, Army Box - Part 3 Painting

Part 3: Painting the Vehicles
For painting I decided to use my airbrush for the primer coat and the base coat. I used "tack" to mount each hull section to a plastic container (the small ones are condiment containers from a restaurant and the larger ones are the icing containers from cinnamon rolls). I labeled each tank and turret so that they went back to their appropriate partner.


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Another view of the models ready to start the painting process

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My Badger 105 Patriot airbrush, a universal airbrush cleaning pot, Vallejo Surface Primer, 70.802 Black, Vallejo Model Air 71.017 Russian Green, Vallejo 71.061 Airbrush Thinner and Vallejo 71.099 Airbrush Cleaner. I use a Campbell Hausfeld, 110 Max PSI, 110 volt air compressor. I usually spray at 5 to 8 PSI. I used several drops of thinner per cup of primer to make sure I have a good flow and one or two in the Model Air paint (it helps improve flow). I use Windex to clean between colors and the airbrush cleaner when I am finished spraying.

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The models primed black. One even coat is enough to give you a very nice finish.

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Another view of the primed models.

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The models with their base coat of Vallejo Model Air 71.017 Russian Green

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It is very hard to see the subtle changes in the color of the next three pictures. In this one all of the vehicles received a heavy coat of Citadel Shade - Nulin Oil. This darkened the base coat slightly and put shadows in all recesses of the models. I apply it straight from the bottle without any thinning. Use a damp brush to prevent pooling of the shade in any flat areas. You can use any brown/black shade that you prefer. I usually use Citadel Shad - Agrax Earthshade on my German vehicles but wanted to try the Nulin Oil on these. I was very happy with the results.

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A heavy dry brush of Vallejo Model Color 70.924 Russian Uniform WWII was applied. I used an Army Painter Hobby Dry brush. I purchased it for this project to try. I was very happy with the results. The brush head is about 3/8" wide, perfect for doing vehicles of this size. If you look closely you can see the dark shadows in the recesses from the shade layer. I did not worry about being neat, I dry brushed the entire model at this point including tracks

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This image shows the next step. A highlight dry brushing with a 2:1 mixture of Vallejo Model Color 70.924 Russian Uniform WWII and Vallejo Model Color 70.884 Stone Grey. I made sure to hit any of the heavy wear areas with this and tried to keep it off of any flat panels. Corners, seams, grills, hatches, weld lines: anything that would be raised up and show more wear and tear than the rest of the vehicle. Use your eye and apply as much or as little as you like.

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Here is a closer view of a turret with the shade and two drybrush treatments. You can an see how the edges of the hatch, gun mantel and other raised plates have a worn look. Once again if you want more or less highlights you can adjust accordingly. I was very happy with the final results. This was the first time I used this process. It was easy to do and gave very good results in a short amount of time.

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View of the finished vehicles waiting for the detail and decal phase

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A close up of the command vehicle. At this point I was ready to paint all of the stowage on the vehicles. Some people may skip this step so I am not going into much detail. I painted using the following colors:
Wood - Vallejo Model Color 70.872 Chocolate Brown
Wood Highlight - Vallejo Model Color 70.984 Flat Brown
Rubber Tracks and Wheels - Flames of War 862 Black Grey (to me this looks more like rubber than black)
Tools/Mg's - Reaper Master Series Paint - 09052 Shadowed SteelRubber Tracks and Wheels - Flames of War 862 Black Grey (to me this looks more like rubber than black)Tools/Mg's - Reaper Master Series Paint - 09052 Shadowed SteelRubber Tracks and Wheels - Flames of War 862 Black Grey (to me this looks more like rubber than black)Tools/Mg's - Reaper Master Series Paint - 09052 Shadowed SteelPacks/Tarps - Vallejo Model Color 70.821 German Camo Beige WWII, 70.884 Stone Grey.
Once finished I washed all of the accessories with Citadel Agrax Earth Shade. I made sure not to get it on any of the previously finished hull.

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A close up of one of the half tracks. This really shows the highlights of the final drybrush coat. It brings all of the small details out of the background.

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For this project I used the Plastic Soldier DEC15013 Guards Armoured Division decal pack.

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The set comes with four decal sheets. For my HQ and 2 platoons I went with the 2nd Armoured Battalion Grenadier Guards (red 51 on the vehicles). There was not enough decals to do the third platoon so I choose B Squadron of the 1st Armoured Battalion Coldstream Guards. For the Motor Platoon they are the 1st Motor Battalion Grenadier Guards. All were sections of the Guards Armoured Division. The Guards shield and the red numerical decals go on front and back of the vehicle. The yellow bridge weight marker goes on the front and the triangle/square/circles are turret markings for the squadrons. You will see the decals in the finished images. I used Vallejo Gloss Varnish 70.510 to protect the area of the decals. Once dried I used Testors Model Master Decal Setting Solution. If you follow the directions you have excellent results on and surface

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Chipping was added by using a small piece of sponge, approximately 1/4'" x 1/4" with the face torn unevenly. I used Vallejo 70836 London Grey for the chipping. I dipped the end of the sponge in the paint, patted it on the paper until it was almost dry then dabbed it on the vehicle where I wanted chips to appear. You can do this as heavily as you like. I tried to do a variety on each vehicle to represent newer replacement vehicles and ones that have been in service longer.

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I used Wilder TE03 Dark Brown Textured Earth for weathering. I usually used powders but wanted to try the premixed product. It is a paste like consistency and you apply it with a brush to areas that you with to have weathering. Depending on the amount of pigment you apply you will have a smooth or textured finish when it dries. I applied a light coat to represent dust and heavier in certain areas to show mud build up. I am very pleased with the final results and it looks great at this scale. It is much quicker that using pigment powder and fixative and I believe it will last longer on the vehicle when handled for game play.

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For a metallic finish on the tracks I used a #2 graphite pencil. I do not like metallic paint on this scale so i use the pencil to highlight tools, mg's and tracks. The vehicle on the left has had the track ends treated, the one on the right has not. It is very subtle but looks very good at this and also 28mm scale. This picture also gives a nice view of the dried weathering effects and chip variation on two different vehicles. Once the metallic highlight was completed all of the vehicles received a finish coat of Testors Spray Lacquer. It provides a very durable finish that protects your models from handling.


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In Part 4 I tackle the Figures